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Division of Academic Engagement and Student Achievement WSU Common Reading

WSU Nominations for 2020-21 Common Reading Book Close Fri., Nov. 15

Karen Weathermon, director of the Common Reading program at WSU.

Karen Weathermon, director of the Common Reading program at WSU.Karen Weathermon, director of the Common Reading program at WSU.PULLMAN, Wash.—Have you read a good book lately that lends itself to a theme of “global stability, scarcity, and security” and would be suitable for freshman classes and programming at Washington State University?

The Common Reading Program announces that nominations for the 2020-21 book are open through Fri., Nov. 15, and can be accessed on the nomination page of the Common Reading website.

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WSU Common Reading Lecture on Sept. 19 Features Irom Presentation on Communication and the Rohingya Refugee Crisis

Bimbisar Irom, assistant professor of communication in the Edward R. Murrow College of Communication.

Bimbisar Irom, assistant professor of communication in the Edward R. Murrow College of Communication.Bimbisar Irom, assistant professor of communication in the Edward R. Murrow College of Communication.PULLMAN, Wash.—Bimbisar Irom, assistant professor of communication at Washington State University, will present at 5 p.m. Mon., Sept. 23 in Todd Hall 216 a lecture titled, “Through Western Eyes: Humanitarian Communication and the Rohingya Refugee Crisis.” The event is hosted by the Common Reading Program and is free and open to the public.

Irom’s talk focuses on Western media coverage of the ongoing Rohingya refugee crisis that originated in Myanmar and has now spilled over into the neighboring countries of Bangladesh, India, Thailand, and Malaysia.

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WSU Common Reading Book Refuge Focuses on Global Refugee Policy

Refuge: Rethinking Refugee Policy in a Changing World, by Alexander Betts and Paul Collier.

Refuge: Rethinking Refugee Policy in a Changing World, by Alexander Betts and Paul Collier.Refuge: Rethinking Refugee Policy in a Changing World, by Alexander Betts and Paul Collier.Pullman, Wash.—The book selected as the Washington State University common reading for first-year and other students in 2019-20 is Refuge: Rethinking Refugee Policy in a Changing World, announced Karen Weathermon, director of first-year programs in WSU Undergraduate Education.

Refuge will be used at the Pullman, Tri-Cities, Spokane, and Global campuses. Published in 2017 by Oxford University Press, it co-authored by Oxford alumni and professors, Alexander Betts, 39, a political scientist, and Sir Paul Collier, 70, a development economist.

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Oct. 22: Soonish Authors Kelly and Zach Weinersmith Will Deliver Common Reading Invited Lecture

Soonish authors Kelly and Zach Weinersmith.

Soonish authors Kelly and Zach Weinersmith depicted in cartoon form.Soonish authors Kelly and Zach Weinersmith depicted in cartoon form.PULLMAN, Wash.—Washington State University announces that the twelfth annual Common Reading Invited Lecture will be presented at 7 p.m. Mon., Oct. 22, in CUB M.G. Carey Senior Ballroom, featuring Kelly and Zach Weinersmith. The event is open at no cost to everyone; a book signing will follow the lecture.

“How Little We Know: Why Most of Our Opinions Are Probably Wrong” is the title chosen for the lecture by the authors of this year’s common reading book at the college. Soonish: Ten Emerging Technologies That’ll Improve and/or Ruin Everything is being used in dozens of WSU classes for first-year and other students. Extracurricular programming and events help to take the conversation about book topics beyond the classrooms. » More …

Now Open: Nominations for 2019-20 Common Reading Book (through Nov. 2)

United nations, fish market, and a computer lock representing the 2019-2021 common reading theme of global stability, scarcity, and security.

United nations, fish market, and a computer lock representing the 2019-2021 common reading theme of global stability, scarcity, and security.PULLMAN, Wash.—Have you read a good book lately that lends itself to a theme of “global stability, scarcity, and security” and would be suitable for freshman classes and programming at Washington State University?

The Common Reading Program announces that nominations for the 2019-20 book are now open. An online form may now be used to submit nominations, which will be accepted through Nov. 2. » More …

Sept. 19: WSU researcher Jacob Leachman discusses hydrogen technology and the future at Common Reading lecture

Common Reading lecturer Jacob Leachman.

Common Reading lecturer Jacob Leachman.Common Reading lecturer Jacob Leachman.PULLMAN, Wash.— Learn about hydrogen as a practical and sustainable energy source at a Washington State University Common Reading lecture titled “The HOW of a hydrogen organized Washington (and World!)” presented by Jacob Leachman Wed., Sept. 19 at 4:30 p.m. in CUE 203.

Leachman is an associate professor of mechanical and materials engineering, and director WSU’s Hydrogen Properties for Energy Research (HYPER) Lab. The goal of the lab is to efficiently advance the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of hydrogen systems. » More …

Author of “The Naked Roommate” to speak at WSU on Sept. 13, pizza following lecture

Harlan Cohen, a nationally syndicated advice columnist , will discuss “The Naked Truth About Life in College” at Washington State University Sept. 13 at 4:30 p.m. in CUE 203. A reception with pizza will follow in the CUE atrium.

This event is sponsored by Washington GEAR UP and the WSU Common Reading Program, a part of the Office of Undergraduate Education.

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“The Law and Emerging Technologies” to be presented Sept. 5 by Jacob Rooksby, new Gonzaga law dean

Dean of Gonzaga University School of Law Jacob Rooksby.

Dean of Gonzaga University School of Law Jacob Rooksby.Dean of Gonzaga University School of Law Jacob Rooksby.PULLMAN, Wash.— Jacob H. Rooksby, dean of the Gonzaga University School of Law, will deliver the inaugural Common Reading lecture for 2018-19 on Wed., Sept. 5, at 5 p.m. in CUE 203 at Washington State University.

The public is welcome at no charge to this event, which is cosponsored by the Common Reading Program with the WSU Pre-Law Resource Center.

First-year and other WSU students are reading the common book, Soonish: Ten Emerging Technologies That’ll Improve and/or Ruin Everything for many classes, and enjoying extracurricular programming related to it. The lecture series allows students to learn from experts in their fields about topics raised in the book. Rooksby’s presentation will be the first guest lecture of many this 2018-19 academic year. » More …

Common Reading Book for 2018-19 “Soonish” Explores Future Technologies

Soonish: ten emerging technologies that'll improve and/or ruin everything, by Kelly and Zach Weinersmith.

Soonish: ten emerging technologies that'll improve and/or ruin everything, by Kelly and Zach Weinersmith.Soonish: ten emerging technologies that'll improve and/or ruin everything, by Kelly and Zach Weinersmith.PULLMAN, Wash.—Washington State University announced that its 2018-19 common read for first-year and other students is Soonish: Ten Emerging Technologies That’ll Improve and/or Ruin Everything.

Published by Penguin Random House in 2017, it is written by Kelly and Zach Weinersmith. Kelly is a bioscientist, adjunct faculty member at Rice University, and natural-science podcaster. Her husband, Zach, is a cartoonist and creator of the popular geek webcomic Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal. His work adds new dimensions to her text in Soonish.

The 10 different technological developments explored in the book examine what may be coming “soonish.” » More …

WSU Common Reading presents David Shier on “Being Human Virtually” March 21

March 16, 2018

PULLMAN, Wash.–David Shier, associate dean of the Honors College at Washington State University, will present “Being Human Virtually” at 7:00 p.m. Wed., March 21, in Todd 130, hosted by the Common Reading Program. The lecture is free and open to the public. https://commonreading.wsu.edu/.

The lecture develops topics Shier taught in his fall Honors course, “Me, Myself, and AI.” » More …